When case management first evolved as an occupation, …

When case management first evolved as an occupation, there existed no models or theories from which to learn. Case managers simply observed their clients and provided services based upon their perceptions of the clients’ needs. As time went by, researchers began to organize case managers’ practices into prominent models that are used today. Some of these models include the task-centered model, assertive model, relational psychoanalytic model, empowerment model, and strengths-based model. Each case management model presents a unique approach to the case management process for a variety of clients. For example, the strengths-based model is the cornerstone on which most case management models are built. This model seeks to empower clients through attention to relationships between case managers and clients and the establishment of client autonomy. Each model can be effective with certain clients, and it is up to case managers to determine which model is most appropriate for their clients. This week’s Course Media introduces you to three case studies that you use throughout the course. Each week, you apply new concepts to address the needs illustrated in each case.